jump to navigation

Fun with Spring, GWT and Annotations March 4, 2010

Posted by Phill in Frameworks, Spring.
Tags: , , , ,
comments closed

Recently I’ve been porting across some of our monolithic IceFaces application to a more modular GWT application. (There’s nothing wrong with IceFaces as such, but for several reasons I don’t think it’s the right fit for us any more).

It’s been going pretty well so far, although I’ve only been working on it for a few days. I’ve got the GWT-Widget server library up and running as well, which integrates nicely with Spring for RPC. (It basically means you don’t have to define a new servlet in web.xml for each RPC server you want, you can just define them as Spring beans).

However, it does mean that you have to create a mapping for each Spring bean that you want to publish and define it in the application context XML, which isn’t really ideal for modular applications: I’d quite like them to be detected automatically with annotations, that way if you have another module on the classpath it will automatically be picked up.

So, I created another annotation (@RPCService) and annotated my RPC endpoints with it. The annotation, as its value, had the URL of that endpoint (i.e. “/user” for the users RPC service)

Then, my initial thought was to use Spring to scan the classpath and load each one up. I’ll cut a long story short here and say that was all unecessary: if your RPC classes are defined in the application context (via XML or annotations, it doesn’t matter), all you need to do is get an instance of the Application Context and call getBeansWithAnnotation.

This makes things really simple: I have a bean set up which has an initialise method that uses that method to get all classes annotated with my RPCService annotation, finds out their URLs, and then configures the GWTHandler servlet to map those beans.

Dead easy! And very useful to do, if you’re using the GWT-Widgets library.

Edit: After reading the documentation it seems that what I’ve done is essentially re-implement what’s already available in the library. Still, hopefully it will come in useful if you need to do something similar for another usage…